OUR MEMORIES
TSE Y S Peter


 

 

Peter of All Trades

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Peter has been involved in Hong Kong Racing for many years since the mid of the last century.

He first as an apprentice Jockey in the amateur days, then became professional jockey, in 1977 as an Assistant Trainer, Trainer and then an Official of HKJC.

He always wanted to have a racing career ever since he first been affectionately involved with horses.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

1944 August, Peter was born.

His family was in the wine trade, with only his brother had riding experience in UK.

Peter has been very interested in horses ever since he was a child.

But all his relatives were not Jockey Club members; they didn’t even have a bet.

Though with soccer and tennis talents, his equestrian interest was self-motivated, right from the start.

He commenced his lesson in the Sha Tin Pak Lok Riding School run by veteran jockeys C F Liu and Chen Poo.

While he was still at school in the early ’60s, he used to go to Fanling to ride via a long trek.

The train journey took an hour, and then from Fanling station he would get a lift on the back of a bicycle to Beas River.

Half the day was gone already just getting there and getting back. But the horse riding made it all worth while he loved it.

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS

 

When he finished his secondary school, he worked for his father in the wine trade.

But since it was a family business he was able to take time off for further expeditions to Fanling.

He had to wait till he was 21 before he could apply to the Jockey Club to become a member.

1968-1969 he enrolled in the riding course in Beas River conducted by Major Tony Grimshaw.

Then after passing an exam he was granted an apprentice licence.

He was eligible to ride only in so-called apprentice or novice races.

In those days they had to win three such novice races before qualifying to ride in open races.

There used to be only 20 novice races per season or an average of only three apprentice races each month.

With only 23 meetings per year, so there was very little chance of qualifying.

 

1972 when racing turned professional, all jockeys, apprentices included, over the age of 23, automatically became full professional jockeys.

Even though they hadn’t necessarily ridden the requisite ten winners in open races.

So there he was a full jockey riding against the likes of Geoff Lane and Peter Gumbleton.

 

He had to learn fast, and the racing was very competitive.

Russian trainers, Nick Metrevelli felt he could trust Peter, took care of him and they got on very well together.

 

1970-03-07 Peter Tse’s first ride:

Race 1, Class 9, HV 1/2 mile and 170 yds, Novice, a field of 12, INSURER, (trainer:Metrevelli)unplaced.

 

1973-04-28 Peter Tse’s first win:

Race 4, Class 4, HV 1650m, American Club Club Cup, a field of 12, LEADON, (trainer:Metrevelli)20 to 1.

 

Nick provided Peter with the vital winning opportunities and his career as a jockey prospered.

 

1977, Peter retired from his jockey career after winning his last double on HILARIOUS and HAPPY CENTURY.

 

 

Every summer Peter went overseas to learn more.

 

Referred by Trainer Goswell, Peter practiced in England and traveled with Eddie K C Lo and Ricky P F Yiu.

 

He was prepared to turn his hand to anything, provided it involved him in being close to racehorses.

He mucked out stables and learned stable management.

Over the years he visited the U.K., Ireland, France, the U.S.A. and Canada learning his craft from 30 to 40 trainers in several different countries.

From very early on, his ambition was to become a trainer one day.

 

Peter worked first for Gordon Smyth for five years, for Derek Kent for four years.

He saddled his first winner in 1985-1986, as acting trainer in Kent’s stable.

From 1986, he assisted Chue Po-ming, and also, of course, Peter learned a lot from Nick Metrevelli.

 

1988-07-01 Peter was granted a full trainer‘s licence at the age of 43, replacing Jerry Ng who reached mandatory retiring age.

He began with over thirty horses, including ten formerly trained by Jerry Ng.

As supports of owners were positive, Peter did not require any formal allocation of new horses by HKJC.

 

1988-10-30 Peter scored his first winner as a trainer.

MONEY MACHINE, owned by Fong Biu and Edward Ng Lee Wah, did win so well, with Tony Chan in the saddle.

 

1996-11-30 OUTERWEAR (BJ241) was his last winner with D Whyte on board.

They landed the St Andrew’s Challenge Quaich on 1800m in Happy Valley, defeating John Moore and Win Chung’s KWACHA (BJ175) by a neck.

John Moore transferred OUTERWEAR to let Peter give a victory for elderly owner Chan Yu Shun who might not want to wait for a replacing griffin.

 

Shortly, Peter became the manager of All Weather Track, after studied in USA.

2004, he retired from the post of HKJC Assistant Track Manager.

2008, he served as the Quarantine Manager of the Olympic Equestrian Events held in Hong Kong.

 

 

SUMMARY

 

Peter has lots of good advices from his experiences:

You must know your horses, you must love your horses.

There’s one other vital aspect – put simply it is good horses.

Without good horses you can’t win races.

Without winning races you don’t attract the owners.

 

 

REFERENCE

 

Jockey Career:

Season: Win/Race

1971-1972: 0/30

1972-1973: 1/42

1973-1974: 3/75

1974-1975: 5/77

1975-1976: 8/102

1976-1977: 4/75

Total Wins: 21

Including:

1972-1973 American Club Cup (LEAD ON)

 

Trainer Career:

Season — Wins — Total Stakes

1985-1986 — 1 — $151,400

1988-1989 — 10 — $2,749,100

1989-1990 — 12 — $3,594,130

1990-1991 — 14 — $3,465,560

1991-1992 — 15 — $3,523,325

1992-1993 — 7 — $2,529,725

1993-1994 — 4 — $2,574,875

1994-1995 — 9 — $3,069,850

1995-1996 — 4 — $2,759,742

1996-1997 — 2 — $919,260

10 seasons as trainer

78 winners saddled

 

 

EXTERNAL LINK

 

American Club Cup- 《RacingMemories.HK》

 

 

Acknowledgement to Mr YU Chi Hung for supplying and verifying data

Acknowledgement to Mr Peter YUEN for rectifying record data.

Acknowledgement to HKJC Racing Registry for offering record data.

 

 

 


 

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